Diagnostic/medical imaging

Diagnostic/medical imaging

We carry out a broad range of imaging services across our hospitals:

  • X-rays
  • Computed Tomography
  • Fluoroscopy
  • Angiography
  • Ultrasound
  • Nuclear Medicine
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging

We deliver services to inpatients, outpatients and Emergency Department patients as well as patients who are referred by their GP.

All patients are asked to take preparation instructions seriously.

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Location: From the main atrium, head towards Core B past the Orthopaedic Clinic on the left. Diagnostic Imaging is on the corner.  

We also have a satellite department at the City Care Centre on Thorpe Road.

Telephone: 01733 678384 Peterborough  

Our department:

  • Can conduct around 1,000 diagnostic imaging examinations in just one day

  • Has undertaken the nationally recognised “Imaging Services Accreditation Scheme” (2014), which is assessed by the United Kingdom Accreditation Service licensed by The Royal College of Radiologists and the College of Radiographers

 

Imaging we perform

X-ray

The department provides X-ray examinations where images of the inside of a body part are obtained using a small dose of radiation. These images are then assessed and reported on to help diagnosis. 

You may be asked to put on an X-ray gown for the examination, particularly if you are wearing clothing which contains metal (eg buttons and zips).  The radiographer will then take X-rays in different positions to help make a successful diagnosis. 

Most X-rays take less than 10 minutes, however some examinations may take longer if a number of body areas require X-rays. 

Female patients between the ages of 12 and 50 years will be asked if they may be pregnant because an X-ray may be harmful to an unborn child. Patients who are pregnant should inform staff who will then decide whether to proceed depending on the type of X-ray needed and the level of risk.

Computed Tomography (CT)

Our CT department operates two scanners at Peterborough City Hospital.  The scanners use X-rays to provide highly detailed images of slices through the body as well as 3-D reconstructions.

The scanners are doughnut-shaped with an opening in the middle. To obtain the images patients pass through the scanner on a moving table.  The scanner operative may ask you to hold your breath for a few seconds as you pass through. A beeping noise may be heard, which signals that the scan is in progress.

Some CT scans may need you to make specific preparations prior to the scan, such as fasting, or taking certain medicines to enhance the quality of the images and chances of diagnosis. We ask all patients to take preparation instructions very seriously. Please contact the department if you have any queries.

We are proud to be the first department in England to offer a radiographer-led CT Virtual Colonoscopy service.  This is a revolutionary scan of the bowel, which creates 3-D reconstructions for analysis by specialists.  This scan is more efficient, comfortable and accurate than previous tests and we are pleased it is now available to our patients.    

Fluoroscopy

In our Fluoroscopy department we have two specialist machines which use radiation to take continuous images of contrast (X-ray dye) materials moving through a patient’s body.  

Prior to attending a Fluoroscopy appointment, you may be asked to follow specific preparation instructions, such as fasting or taking certain medicines to enhance the quality of the images and chances of diagnosis.  All patients are asked to take these preparation instructions very seriously. Please contact the department if you have any questions. 

Fluoroscopy examinations take longer than conventional X-ray examinations. This means you may need to wait for the contrast material to move through your body before the examination can proceed.

Angiography

We have two angiography suites at Peterborough City Hospital. One is dedicated to diagnostic imaging of the heart (Cardiac Catheter lab) and the other is used for diagnostic and treatment procedures of other body areas (Interventional Radiology Theatre). 

Angiography involves injecting a contrast (X-ray dye) into your blood vessels in order to examine them.  It is often used to identify any areas that are narrowing (Stenoses), which can be re-opened to enable better blood flow using a special 'balloon' (Angioplasty).

 

Ultrasound

We have team of specialist Sonographers (Ultrasound operators) who use modern Ultrasound equipment to examine patients using sound waves. Ultrasound is a valuable form of imaging that involves no radiation and is being used increasingly. Although often associated with pregnancy growth scanning, Ultrasound is also used to look at organs, soft tissue and blood vessels in real time and in different dimensions.

Prior to attending appointments patients may be asked to follow specific preparation instructions such as fasting or keeping a full bladder for a given period of time to enhance the quality of the images and chances of diagnosis. Patients are asked to take preparation instructions very seriously. Please contact the department if you have any queries.

Nuclear Medicine

We operate two Nuclear Medicine Gamma Camera scanners one of which is combined with a CT scanner.  In Nuclear Medicine specialist Radiographers inject patients with a radioactive isotope, which will move through the body to areas of interest and then emit radiation to highlight these areas to the scanners.

Patients visiting Nuclear Medicine often come for an injection in the morning and return in the afternoon (after a specific time period) for the scan, when the radiation has reached the area of interest.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

We are privileged to operate two state of the art MRI scanners at Peterborough City Hospital. MRI produces very detailed 2-D and 3-D images of the body without the use of any radiation. Instead a large powerful magnet is used to create pulses that produce images. However, because MRI uses magnetism, it cannot be used for some patients who have implants with ferrous metals in their bodies (such as pacemakers).

MRI scans can take from 20 minutes to more than an hour. The scan involves the patient lying on a table inside a tubular structure within the magnet. The magnetic pulses produce loud 'beeping' and 'clunking' sounds. Earplugs are given to patients for their comfort.   

While some patients who experience feelings of claustrophobia may feel nervous about having an MRI scan, the magnet tube is open at both ends and the MRI operator can stop the scan and remove the table from the magnet quickly at any time. For some scans we can also play music through earphones to help patients relax. 

The operator will talk to you through an intercom during the scan. so you are aware of what is happening and how the scan is progressing.

Contact us:

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Location: Radiology department, Stamford Hospital

Telephone: 01780 764151

Opening times: 9am to 5pm Monday to Friday.